Young Goodman Brown: a Parable of Sin and Faith

Nov 17, 2017 at Literature Essays

The  short  story  “Young  Goodman  Brown”  by  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  is  a  tale  rather  about  the  spiritual  adventure  of  Goodman  Brown  than  his  misadventure  on  an  “evil  purpose”.  There  is  not  a  general  agreement  whether  it  is  a  parable,  fable,  or  all  special  kinds  of  allegorical  endeavor.  Considering  the  tale  as  parable  it  is  obvious  that  its  main  purpose  to  teach  a  lesson  of  a  sin  and  faith.  

Goodman Brown’s Self-Doubt

Due  to  Christian  beliefs  doubt  itself  is  an  essential  root  of  a  sin.  Once  doubt  enters  it  is  impossible  to  fully  dismiss  it.  Actually  the  story  begins  with  a  Goodman  Brown’s  self-doubt  after  three  months  of  marriage.  Driven  by  his  doubt,  the  main  hero  sets  off  on  a  difficult  journey.  His  wife  Faith  tries  to  persuade  him  not  to  leave  her.  Her  name  is  not  accidental,  as  she  will  represent  religious  conviction  of  Brown  throughout  the  tale.  

Solar Myth

The  story  is  based  on  so-called  solar  myth:  the  main  hero  Goodman  Brown  leaves  his  motherland  faces  a  lot  of  challenges  and  comes  back.  After  his  journey  Brown  changes,  and  his  doubt  immediately  supplants  his  faith.  He  commits  a  sin  when  he  comes  to  the  forest,  but  it  allows  him  to  look  at  his  life,  his  faith  and  at  all  humanity  from  a  different  perspective.  After  arriving  home  Brown  is  uncertain  whether  the  previous  night's  events  were  a  dream  or  real,  but  his  belief  that  he  lived  among  real  Christians  is  distorted.  His  previous  idealistic  perception  of  reality  disappears  and  he  lives  his  life  suspicious  and  embittered  cynic  among  other  self-centered  and  insincere  cynics.  Brown  loses  his  faith  and  his  death  is  doom  and  gloom.  

In  this  short  story  Hawthorne  criticizes  immoral  and  deceitful  way  of  life  of  Puritans.  By  and  large,  it  refers  to  all  humanity,  to  its  vices  and  temptations.  Thirst  for  forbidden  knowledge,  people  doubt,  and  sin  and  lose  their  faith.  And  what  if  a  human  doubt  is  the  nature  of  human  life?

 

Related essays